Oral Hygiene & overall Health Key facts and findings

Executive Summary

  • Oral diseases are impacting billions of people worldwide

  • Studies show that poor Oral-Health can lead to Systemic Diseases e.g., people with gum disease are twice as likely as others to die from a heart attack and 3 times as likely to have a stroke

  • Prevention and education are critical to improve Oral-Health

  • Gamifying the brushing experience is a key lever for better prevention

Bibliography / References

  • Center for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/

  • World Health Organization, Fact sheet N°318, April 2012

  • Oral Systemic Connection, 2016

  • Scientific American, ‘Healthy Mouth, Healthy Planet’, Neil Savage, October 19, 2016

  • Determination of Effective Mechanisms for Altering Tooth Brushing Behavior — Lehavi, Shlomo, R, 2009

  • Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. United States. Public Health Service. Office of the Surgeon General. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. 2000

  • Fehrenbach MJ, Herring SW. Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck. 4th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2012:127-151.

  • Mathews MJ, Mathews EH, Mathews GE. Oral health and coronary heart disease. BMC Oral Health. 2016;16(1):122. Published online November 15, 2016. doi: 10.1186/s12903-016-0316-7.

  • Writing group members, Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: A report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2016;133(4):e38-e360. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000350.

  • Li Y, Lee S, Hujoel P et al. Prevalence and severity of gingivitis in American adults. Am J Dent. 2010;23(1):9-13.

  • Stroke facts. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm. Updated March 24, 2015. Accessed January 17, 2017.

  • Freire MO, Van Dyke TE. The mechanisms behind oral-systemic interactions. In: Glick M, ed. The Oral-Systemic Health Connection: A Guide to Patient Care. Chicago, IL: Quintessence; 2014:Chapter 5, 103-119.

  • Leishman SJ, Do HL, Ford PJ. Cardiovascular disease and the role of oral bacteria. J Oral Microbiol. 2010; 2. doi: 10.3402/jom.v2i0.5781.

  • Jeffcoat M, Parry S, Sammel M, Clothier B, Catlin A, Macones G. Periodontal infection and preterm birth: successful periodontal therapy reduces the risk of preterm birth. BJOG. 2011;118(2):250-256. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02713.x.

  • Gum disease symptoms. American Academy of Periodontology. https://www.perio.org/consumer/gum-disease-symptoms.htm. Accessed January 17, 2017.

  • Mayo Clinic staff. Diseases and conditions. Periodontitis. Mayo Clinic. con-20021679. Published February 4, 2014. Accessed January 18, 2017.

  • Impact of stroke (stroke statistics). American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Impact-of-Stroke-Stroke-statistics_UCM_310728. Updated June 6, 2016. Accessed January 17, 2017.

Oral diseases are impacting billions of people worldwide

(World Health Organization, Fact sheet N°318, April 2012)
  • Worldwide, 60-90% of school children and nearly 100% of adults have dental cavities

  • 1/3rd of adults are affected by untreated tooth decay (more than 2.4 billion people)

  • 1/4th of middle-aged adults have gum disease so severe that they could lose their teeth

  • 1/3rd of the world’s elderly citizens no longer have any of their original teeth

Chart Tooth Decay Over the Lifespan

Studies show that poor Oral-Health can lead to Systemic Diseases

3 out of 4 Americans have signs of mild periodontal disease or gingivitis. Almost 30% show signs of the more severe disease, chronic periodontitis (Oral Systemic Connection, 2016)

Ongoing studies reveal that periodontitis¹ may raise the risk of some serious health conditions, incl. stroke, respiratory illness, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, even cell mutations that could progress to oral cancers (Scientific American, ‘Healthy Mouth, Healthy Planet’, Neil Savage, October 19, 2016)

Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry found that people with gum disease were twice as likely as others to die from a heart attack and three times as likely to have a stroke.

How oral diseases can affect the overall health ?

The Oral Systemic Connection (2016) reports that there are 3 ways oral disease may affect your overall health

  • Bacteria from the gums enter the saliva, then adhere to water droplets within the air you inhale, aspirated into the lungs, potentially causing pulmonary infection and pneumonia.

  • Bacteria can enter the body’s circulatory system through the gums (periodontium) around teeth and travel to all parts of the body

  • Inflammation associated with periodontal disease may stimulate a second systemic inflammatory response within the body and contribute to or complicate other disease entities that may have an inflammatory origin such as, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, orthopedic implant failure and kidney disease.

Illustration of impact of tooth decayLung

Prevention and education are critical to improve Oral-Health

The Oral Systemic Connection (2016) reports that there are 3 ways oral disease may affect your overall health

  • Oral health plays an important role in the overall health of the body

    “Now you’re seeing quite a bit of emerging evidence that a healthier mouth has beneficial effects on the body”
    Marko Vujicic, chief economist at the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Health Policy Institute.
  • The impacts start at childhood, and last a lifetime:Education of proper brushing techniques and establishing healthy preventive habits early in life is the key to preventing the risk of inflammation that contributes to the progression of disease.

Gamifying the brushing experience is a key lever for better prevention

  • A pilot study conducted at the University of California, San Francisco, evaluated the short-term effect of the Kolibree smart toothbrush on oral hygiene and the motivation of children to brush their teeth daily.

  • 40 children were enrolled. The experimental group used the Kolibree Toothbrush with the Go Pirate game. The control group used the same brush without the App.

  • The results showed significant improvement in oral hygiene, measured by a reduction in dental plaque vs. baseline

  • Reports also showed a significant improvement in the motivation of children. Children reported toothbrushing as fun and were more motivated to brush their teeth

  • Parents said the game helped improve their children’s brushing technique and length of toothbrushing time.

Interactive app for the smart electric toothbrush

Source : This study was funded by the California based Delta Dental Community Care Foundation, Dentegra Group, Inc

Appendix

Interactive app for the smart electric toothbrush
Interactive app for the smart electric toothbrush

More stats about Oral care & Systemic Diseases